Diabetes Portion Control and Weight Management!

I think that Amy has the right idea in this article about diabetes portion control and weight management. None of us like to think about dieting and it one of the most important factors in a diabetic’s lifestyle. Instead of “dieting” maybe we should look at how we eat from the viewpoint, that we are in “control” of what we eat.

 Portion Control and Manage Your Weight! by Amy Stephens
Americans with Type 2 diabetes eat too much food and exercise too little. Studies indicate that diabetic Americans not only eat too much food, but we have a poor picture of the right amount of food. According to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), there are specific portions of certain food groups that everyone needs to eat every day in order to stay healthy.

Portion control is understanding how much a serving size is and how many calories a serving contains. Portion control is important for weight management as the weight is defined by the total calorie intake. Healthy diabetes meal plans, using Aristotle’s philosophy, is the desirable middle between the extremes of excess and deficiency (over-eating and not eating enough), the “golden mean.” Portion control is eating a healthy diabetic diet meal with a balance of amount and types, of varied foods.

If you’re overeating, you’re not the only one – and you may be able to point at least a portion of your finger at the restaurant industry, which commonly serves two, three, and four times the recommended portion of food per meal.

Not sure whether or not you’re eating more than the correct portion? The FDA recommends an average of 2700 calories per day for men and 2000 calories per day for a mildly active male and female respectively.

“An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.” So when you are about to devour the content of that large plate consider that a 180 pound person burns an average of 100 calories per mile from walking by wearing diabetic shoes. That person has to burn 3,500 calories to lose one pound of fat. Calories can add up – rapidly. DO THE MATH! OK 35 miles!

Here’s a brief analysis of recommended portions for commonly over-eaten foods:

* Cheeseburger or Hamburger

The recommended portion for a burger is only 3 ounces, which packs in a light 261 calories and 12 grams of fat. However, the average burger is 7 ounces, which adds more than 600 calories and almost 30 grams of fat to your daily diabetic diet plan.

* Beer and Wine

The FDA recommends that each portion of beer be only 12 ounces (about the size of a can of beer). However, a draft beer may be around 15 ounces. The 12 ounce portion adds only 153 calories to your diet while the larger beer adds 195 calories. the good news, however, is that beer does not contain fat. Yet, it may contain carbohydrates (around 12 grams in 12 ounces.)

As for wine, you won’t receive any grams of fat, but you can save about 50 calories by sticking to the recommended 5 ounce portion (which is only 120 calories). The average glass of wine packs on 168 calories and is served at 7 ounces.

* Ice Cream

Everyone is entitled to a little sweet treat every now and then, right? Well, be sure to emphasize the “little” when it comes to the cold stuff. The average serving size for a cone or cup of ice cream is one cup. However, it’s recommended that you only consume half a cup of ice cream or low fat desserts in one sitting. Half a cup packs on 137 calories and about 7 grams of fat.

* Pancakes

Who doesn’t enjoy a leisurely brunch or breakfast that includes a tall stack? Well, if you’re trying to maintain or lose weight, then you’d better go for diabetic breakfast that includes short stack – the way short stack. The average restaurant serves four pancakes per order. However, the recommended portion is only two. Two pancakes still pack on a healthy amount of diabetes carbohydrates (around 48 grams) and may cost you about 172 calories. Better yet – go for whole wheat pancakes that will reduce the glucose spike in your blood stream.

* Bagel

Next time you order a bagel to go, make sure that you only take about half of the bagel with you at a time. The average serving for a bagel is five inches across. However, it’s recommended that you only eat a three-inch bagel if you’re trying to lose or maintain your weight by checking through body fat scales. Cutting your bagel in half may save you about 200 calories.

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Check it out also for Blood sugar monitors and Blood sugar meters Article Source: eArticlesOnline.com
I hope that you find this article about diabetes portion control and weight management useful in your desire to being a healthier YOU! Do you want more control in your blood sugar levels then check out this FREE report and discover the best ways to avoid high’s and low’s when Controlling Your Blood Sugar Levels


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